Multiplication using the grid method

Multiplication using the grid method

Rest assured that short and long multiplication haven't disappeared - they're still quick, reliable and useful methods for multiplying. What's new is that your child will probably learn to multiply using the 'grid method' before being introduced to short and long multiplication.

Multiplication using grids

A tricky multiplication such as 13 x 8 can always be split up to make it easier:

13 x 8 = 104

and splitting it up

13 x 8 = ( 10 x 8 ) + ( 3 x 8 ) = ( 80 ) + ( 24 ) = 104

The fancy name for "splitting it up" is "the distributive law" and it's the basis for all methods for multiplication past and present.

In a grid the same multiplication looks like this:

grid13

This video shows both the grid method and traditional short multiplication:


And here's a video showing the grid method for long multiplication.


 

The silly thing is that mathematically the grid method and traditional multiplication methods are doing exactly the same thing - it's just the distributive law.

 

I'm Ged, co-founder of Komodo, ex-maths teacher and dad. If you have any questions please get in touch.

About KomodoKomodo is a fun and effective way to boost primary maths skills. Designed for 5 to 11-year-olds to use in the home, Komodo uses a little and often approach to learning maths (15 minutes, three to five times per week) that fits into the busy routine. Komodo helps users develop fluency and confidence in maths - without keeping them at the screen for long.

Find out more about Komodo and how it helps thousands of children each year do better at maths - you can even try Komodo for free.

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